Podcasts

For Creators, Patreon and Language Services Are Linked

For Creators, Patreon and Language Services Are Linked 6000 4000 Atomic Scribe

It’s no secret that the Internet is uncharted territory that holds possibilities we can’t even dream of. Look back 20 years ago and it would be hard to imagine how much of a hold YouTube, Netflix, Spotify, and other streaming content providers have today on our everyday lives.

As these platforms become more and more entrenched in society, how we interact with creators too has changed. For example, Patreon is a website that allows fans of creators to give money to aid creativity. The platform has helped podcasters, artists, musicians, and more earn a wage from areas that used to be more difficult to get revenue from.

What this also means is that creators can also use this income to fund language services that may have been too costly before, such as transcription and translation.

Real-World Example

An example of this is Easy German, which was created to help people around the world learn German through YouTube videos (with almost half a million subscribers at the time of writing this article). These videos are available free online.

But to receive extra benefits, you can pay as little as $1 a month through their Patreon. These benefits include interactive worksheets, vocab lists, and best of all, transcripts. Transcripts are important for the Deaf, hard-of-hearing, or just for people who prefer seeing the words as they learn.

“It’s imperative to be able to reach as many people as you can with your business. So instead of waiting for a huge percentage of the population to learn English, isn’t it more efficient to translate your materials into popular languages?”

“It’s imperative to be able to reach as many people as you can with your business. So instead of waiting for a huge percentage of the population to learn English, isn’t it more efficient to translate your materials into popular languages?”

So, if you’re a creator, should you also transcribe your audio and video? We say, resoundingly, YES!

Doing so is a huge benefit to your supporters, and it also helps creators as well. Now you have a document of all that has been said, which is helpful for searching through text. The text can also be put on your web site to help more people find you through search engines. The same can also be said for translations, which opens up your content to millions more people around the world.

Best of all, Patreon can help fund transcripts and translations. If you’re interested, we recommend starting with our $1/audio minute automatic transcription service, which marries technology with human power to reach 100% accuracy. It is true that language services is an extra cost, but we guarantee that the reach they provide is well worth it.

Here’s How Your Podcast Can Reach More People

Here’s How Your Podcast Can Reach More People 2500 1667 Atomic Scribe

If you’re in the podcasting business or plan to join in, you’ve made a smart move. Podcasts are everywhere these days, with the medium taking over as the likes of Serial, How Stuff Works, the Nerdist, and more have becomes go-to conversation starters.

Why are podcasts becoming so popular? One reason is easy access. Most podcasts are free and can be listened to on one’s phone, so they’re perfect for commutes, while making dinner or while bored at work (not speaking from experience here at Atomic Scribe…).

However, just because podcasts are easy to find, that doesn’t mean they’re accessible to all. If you’re Deaf or hard-of-hearing, there’s little chance for you to join in on the podcast revolution.

  • Transcripts make audio and video available to the Deaf and hard-of-hearing.

  • With the text available on your site, Google and other search engines will promote your podcast in the search results more heavily.

  • Sometimes we’re not as clear as we hope to be. Providing a transcript for your listeners ensures they can go back through your work after or while they listen.

That’s where transcription comes in. By simply providing a transcript of your podcast, you reach millions more that can’t listen to your audio.

Transcripts are also useful for those who just prefer reading while they listen or instead of listening entirely, non-English speakers who might need help with some of your content, anyone who wants to quote your podcast on social media or in an article, and to make it easier to translate your podcast into other languages.

Putting a transcript on your site also helps your content be found by Google and other search engines, which brings you a huge amount of potential new followers.

Here’s the thing: you pay for a transcript once and it’s yours to keep forever. You can keep it on your computer and search for keywords and phrases to make sure you’re not repeating yourself in a new episode you’re working on, or you can use the text to write posts, books, and so much more. It’s really a small price to pay to make your podcast accessible to everyone, including yourself!

What Is Transcription and Why Is It So Important?

What Is Transcription and Why Is It So Important? 2500 1667 Atomic Scribe

What? Transcription is converting a recorded video or audio track into a written format, such as a Word document. Most companies offer verbatim transcription, where every single thing uttered is written down, including “uh,” “um,” and other such filler words. Clean edited verbatim takes out those filler words to ensure a smoother transcript.

Who? Transcription may sound easy initially, but anyone who has sat down to do a transcript realizes quickly that transcription takes a lot of time, energy and skill.

That’s why professional transcriptionists who have trained in the field for years are so important. Transcriptionists not only are trained to be able to make out difficult audio, but they also must have an impressive knowledge of grammar. Additionally, they must know how to research terms that they hear to find correct matches for spelling and context, like if an interviewee casually mentions an acronym or a prescription drug name. Incorrectly transcribing a term can confuse the speaker’s intent, which is a big problem.

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Why? Now to the big question: why is transcription necessary? Is it just an extra cost? Well, no. Transcripts can be used for so many different purposes that it would take too much time to list them all.

But the fact is transcripts are often faster to read than the time it takes to listen to audio or video. It’s also easier to distribute to other people, like clients or coworkers. The text can show up in Google searches, unlike audio or video. The Deaf or hard-of-hearing need transcripts to experience content, and many other people just prefer reading to listening.

We work with companies and individuals in the legal, entertainment, market research, police, government, radio, church, and other fields to make their content easily accessible to all, because that is the main point of transcripts. It’s a one-time cost for content that you can keep forever and use in multiple ways. Make sure you take advantage of transcription services so you don’t miss out.

6 Ways to Learn a Foreign Language

6 Ways to Learn a Foreign Language 2500 1667 Atomic Scribe

Have you ever tried to learn a language but given up out of frustration? Maybe you felt like you were the problem and that you just weren’t meant to master a foreign language. Well, you’re in the majority—most people find learning a language as an adult extremely difficult. But the good news is you aren’t the problem. It’s that you’re not not using the language learning method that works best for you.

More good news: you have lots of options to choose from. Just as we all learn differently in the classroom, we also need to try out new language learning methods until we find the one that best fits. Here are some examples of different methods you can try.

  1. Apps

  2. In-Person Classes

  3. Podcasts

  4. Online Games

  5. Rosetta Stone

  6. Government Resources

1. Apps

Perhaps the most popular language app available, Duolingo is playable both on your phone and computer to learn a variety of languages. It turns the learning process into a game, letting you earn points and nudging you when you haven’t played in a while. The app teaches vocabulary and grammar, but an interesting aspect is it also has the learner speak into the microphone to practice speaking the language. Oh, we forgot the best part: it’s free!

2. In-Person Classes

If you need structure and a classroom setting to learn, there are a multitude of classes to choose from. There are local college classes available, but it’s advised to search out your city and see what all is available. Don’t forget to also look at reviews of the schools or businesses on sites such as Yelp to see what previous students have to say.

3. Podcasts

Our favorite? Radio Lingua. This company provides free podcasts for learning languages when you have a little free time (say, on your coffee break), and then there is further materials available if you buy a premium membership. It’s a great tool for beginners who are in need of a slower pace and to learn the history behind the language you’re learning.

4. Online Games

Not that we ever slack off at work, but sometimes in the office you might catch one of us on BaBaDum. This site is great to use in conjunction with other learning tools, as it helps with vocabulary and pronunciation. The best part, however, might be the terrific illustrations!

BaBaDum in German.

5. Rosetta Stone

This may be our most controversial inclusion because some people hate Rosetta Stone and some people love it. It’s an expensive option, but it’s useful for many. The software really focuses on repetition to teach a language, which may suit certain learners. Our suggestion is to use the free trial to see if it fits your needs.

6. Government Resources

The U.S. Department of Defense maintains the Defense Language Institute to teach languages to service members, but they’ve also made a large amount of learning materials available online. There’s really a wealth of information on there, so make sure to take a look.

Another great resource is this site which has captured all of the Foreign Service Institute’s public domain language lessons. The BBC and other institutions also have free online resources available.

Learning a language doesn’t have to be scary. If one method isn’t working for you, move on to another until you find you perfect fit. Don’t give up!